The World: Some countries are equal, but some are more equal than others.

In high school I studied English Literature. We analyzed a number of books including the Government Inspector, Things Fall Apart and Animal Farm. In retrospect, I feel my level of analysis was yet to grow. I noticed this when I went further with the subject at Advanced Level.

Recently, I got a hold of my old Animal farm book. When I read it afresh, I saw it in a completely different light. I was able to relate a lot of parts in the book to what is happening today. In its simplicity, there is a myriad of points the book has tackled. George Orwell was easily a genius. All of us are very much alive in this book and anyone who claims they aren’t is very likely to be in denial.

To begin with, when Old Major begins to articulate his vision and the status quo, I feel his audience is African countries.

Now, comrades, what is the nature of this life of ours? Let us face it: our lives are miserable, laborious, and short.”

He goes on to say, “But is this simply part of the order of nature? Is it because this land of ours is so poor that it cannot afford a decent life to those who dwell upon it? No, comrades, a thousand times no! The soil of England is fertile, its climate is good, it is capable of affording food in abundance to an enormously greater number of animals than now inhabit it.”

Today we could ask similar questions. It is a no brainer that Africa is the richest continent with unimaginable resources. Diamonds, gold, sugar, salt, petroleum, copper, uranium Zinc, woods, tropical Fruits and the listing could go on and on. However, the average inhabitant has a miserable, laborious and short life. Why is a continent full of potential under backward conditions? Are the resources not enough to eradicate poverty?

Indeed globalization has brought remarkable results that have benefited many countries. Countries now favor opening up since seeing the importance of free trade. All this is meant to be a zero sum game and theoretically it is beautiful, but in reality it isn’t. It is dangerous, it is scary, and it poses drastic threats to the future- the future of Africa. The process has made some countries to become ‘more equal than others more than it has ever been.

According to Honest Accounts 2017,about $162B was pumped into Africa and $203B left. This shows $42B was extracted in profits. This may look like fair profit, but it includes tax evasions, corruption, illegal fishing, hunting, and trade, forcing poor conditions on local labor to cut costs among many others. Multinational companies pay very little tax to our governments who only benefit marginally. The taxation policies are not exactly designed by Africans, but by Western governments and these policies advocate for lowering taxes.

Old major goes on to say “Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run fast enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself. Our labour tills the soil, our dung fertilises it, and yet there is not one of us that owns more than his bare skin.”

Africa is a pawn in the hands of man which is the Western world, and recently, China. In what is supposed to be fair exchange, some countries are benefiting way more than others. The aid, loans, grants, donations and other funding keeps us in a poverty cycle. It is a marvel African leaders still do not practise what Dambisa Moyo said. It is so sad how we are giving a lot of our power to these countries. The future is really scary if we do not wake up. We can’t keep being fooled by these countries .We need a revolution.

In this daylight robbery, we cannot overlook the role a few of our very own brethren play. The elite few simply allow wealth to flow out of Africa and this way they become wealthy at the expense of their own blood. Judas Iscariot surely never died on that tree. If those with authority and in positions to make it hard for our wealth to be stolen lost their greed and realized they have a future to protect, we could have solved a huge puzzle on our way to development. We can’t keep obtaining bribes, gifts and other short term benefits just to unlock access for foreigners to steal our land, our minerals, and our children’s future. Our politicians need to truly have love for the people by eliminating corruption and by putting us first. Even a maniac like Trump puts his people first.

George Orwell also brings Moses in the picture. Moses represents organized religion and the typical sermon of the flowery place on the other side. Today religion is one of the factors why we can’t progress as Africa. Fake prophets, and money centered religious leaders are reaping from the poor while imparting laziness and irrationality into their heads through dogma. A lot of people want the easy way out and will not take action to change or develop their current poor state when they are totally capable. They would rather pray.

We get to see how the pigs change a lot of rules to justify a lot of their wrong deeds, but because animals, e.g. boxer, won’t read or pay attention to what was prior, they are blind to see the amendments. Also they are gullible. Today a lot are bound in the chains of ignorance. They do not know exactly what to stand for. They will support a political party like a football team at the expense of their children’s future. They have no idea what the constitution or the fundamentals that would show how valuable they are and what rights they possess. I wouldn’t blame them though, their woes are circumstantial. Boxer is the uneducated poor man on whom politicians thrive daily. He will sale his vote for temporary pleasure.

Even the educated that do not stand up against the wrong are as good as boxer. Former late Zambian President Michael Sata used to say the greatest cowards are the educated. At least boxer is given a little leeway because he is ignorant, but the educated who know how they should be treated are expected to protest when the government takes advantage of them or asks them to pay a funny tax. The attitude to fight for our inheritance has died out. The true government is the people and we constantly forget that.

We could go on and on with the symbolism in animal farm, but the most important thing is to realize our position and act. It is for Africa to stand up and realize that there will never be Africa if we keep selling it for coins. We could also hope to see the light in Africa- to eliminate the backwardness we suffer from and to stop tolerating neo colonialism. We can change the game; the power has always been with the people.

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ZAMBIAN FASHION DESIGNER BASED IN CHINA.

1) It’s an honour to have you on Aquilaspeaks kindly go ahead and give a brief introduction of yourself.

1. I’m Gabriella Amy Malonda commonly known as Amy or Gabby depending on which country I’m in. LOL. Proudly Zambian.

2) How did you find yourself in this field?

2. I’ve always loved the arts as a kid I just didn’t know which side of it until I started my journey to self discovery.

3) Did you have any doubts in yourself when you just begun?

3. Yes of course! I thought I was losing my mind to want to start a clothing brand with $50.

4) Do you consider yourself a Zambian designer or an international designer?

4. Well I’m Zambian and live in China what would that mean? 😂😂😂 Zambians barely even buy my clothes. So international it is.

5) I am very aware that you are currently based in China. How do you use this location to advantage if there are any at all?

5. I live in a country where possibilities are endless it’s just a matter of being resourceful and open minded.

6) You were some time last year featured on CTGN. How did that experience play for you?

6. It played out well actually. Nothing better than getting a little Recognition in a foreign land. They say be the change you want to see. And I want to do that in this industry.

7) State your top 3 designers and which designer inspires you the most and why?

7. Fenty( Rihanna), Balmain( Olivier Rousteig) & David Tlale… they all correspond with my personality, a little bit of elegance, sass and fierce.

8) Your clothing line was displayed at the recent Shanghai black fashion week. How would you describe that experience?

8. That Experience was Amazing, loved every bit of it. Nothing sweet comes without sweat right ? It paid off the sleepless nights.

9) Is the Zambian designing field progressing profusely? What would you say about it?

9. It really is progressing but at a slow rate and that’s because designers need to be on their toes and do more research in their field as well as encourage Zambians to get with the program. Fashion is what you buy, Style is how you wear it.

10) How has been the response from Zambia in terms of support and purchasing your products?

10. It’s Slow, Zambians don’t like to support each other. They support the hype! What’s happening right now! Kinda vibe.

11)Would you mind sharing some of your highest and Lowest moments in your career?

11. When I Great creative block, it’s gets really frustrating.. it’s like a doddling like a child with no direction.. 😂! Highest hasn’t occurred yet! Still got lots to do. I’m still a new born to this industry

12) What would your words be to young girls back in Zambia?

12. Young girls in Zambia. Start being more independent, find your yourself. Discover your purpose and fulfil it not matter the career path.

13) Lastly, where can we buy your merchandise?

13. I currently don’t ship out of China. But can be purchased from me directly. I don’t mind sharing my contact information.

AquilaSpeaks wishes to thank Amy for her time to stop by our blog. Wish you all the best in your future career pursuits. Hope all the readers are inspired and especially many young women out there as this post was hugely centred on woman empowerment. You can reach Amy for more information as per the information given below. Great weekend Abena Zambia. 👍

THE FUTURE OF ZAMBIAN FOOTBALL: Hello Mubanga Vwalika

AquilaSpeaks: What are your full names and how old are you?

Mubanga: Before we start, I believe this is worth mentioning. I have a twin brother, who is also an amazing football player and everywhere I’ve been for football he’s been there too. Like everywhere! His name is Mwiza Bellington Vwalika. Any way my names are Mubanga Anthony Vwalika, I am 20 years old.

AquilaSpeaks: Where are you currently based?

Mubanga: Shanghai, China.

AquilaSpeaks: What club do you play for?

Mubanga: China Origin

AquilaSpeaks: What sparked the interest in football?

Mubanga: My parents took us for so many activities, we had way too much energy when we were young. But it was a special moment the first time we stepped on a football pitch.

AquilaSpeaks: What challenges do you face as an international footballer or just as a footballer in general?

Mubanga: Time management, staying healthy and discipline.

AquilaSpeaks:Which Zambian football legend or footballer do you look up to?

Mubanga: It’s always been Kalusha Bwalya, he really pushed the bar for Zambian football. But right now it’s the entire Zambia U20 football team and in particular, Patson Daka. Really good footballer, really nice and hard working and guy. Really amazing what they achieved last year collectively and individually (for Patson).

AquilaSpeaks: What are some of the proudest moments in your career?

Mubanga: Playing football in Europe. I have played in youth tournaments like the prestigious Gothia cup (Gothenburg, Sweden), Dana cup (Hjorring, Denmark) , Paris world games (Paris France), Valencia cup (Valencia Spain), Kommit youth challenge (Barcelona, Spain) to mention a few. The one that takes the cake though is playing for the U-17 national team, and to do that with my twin brother was all the more special.

AquilaSpeaks: What is your dream team to one day play for in future?

Mubanga: It is my dream to play for the Zambia national team and help qualify for our first ever word cup. We deserve to be there. Also to play among the Elite in the big European leagues.

AquilaSpeaks: How would playing for the national team change things for you?

Mubanga: As something I’ve always dreamed about since I was really young, it would firstly bring huge satisfaction not just to me, but the village that it took to make that happen. Secondly, it would be great exposure, only the best get to play for the national team and so it would open doors.

AquilaSpeaks: Ronaldo or Messi?

Mubanga: Messi is a remarkable once in a generation type of player, but Ronaldo all day for me.

AquilaSpeaks: Lastly, what words of advice would you give to young Zambians like you who are pursuing big dreams?

Mubanga: Never ever give up, keep dreaming, keep working hard. Believe that he who started the good work, will surely see it to completion.

AquilaSpeaks: Indeed He who started the good work, will surely see it to completion. Great words from Mubanga really. It is always encouraging to see young People, especially Zambians, that are taking a very special road that will direct to great history creation eventually. You can comment below if you have any encouraging words for Mubanga. I wish him all the best in his career and I hope that he and his brother could in the future help us qualify for the world cup and even win it.

Look out for the next interview next week with someone all the way from Nigeria.

Let us be the change we wish to see, Zambian youths, for we are the future.

If you have any friends doing great and need recognition, feel free to contact me

Thembi: Your favorite Zambian Make Up artist


AquilaSpeaks: Kindly introduce yourself to the people.
Thembi: I Am Abigail Thembiso Moyo aged 25, a pharmacy technologist by profession and a part time makeup artist.
AquilaSpeaks: How did you find yourself on this journey?

Thembi: Being artistic has always been a hobby from childhood, growing up I would express how I felt about a particular situation through drawing, painting and design. As I got older I developed interest in being a stage makeup artist for SFX makeup but due to lack of materials, I decided to focus on beauty makeup.

AquilaSpeaks: How has the journey been so far?

Thembi: Its been quite an interesting and amazing learning Journey being a self-taught makeup artist in Zambia. It has given me an opportunity to work and interact with different people within and out of Zambia.
AquilaSpeaks: Any Notable people you have worked with?

Thembi: I have worked with one of Zambia’s talented Photographers Davies Tony Marko, owner and founder of Tony Media, I have also worked with Zambian female dance hall musician based in Germany, Cassy Nyemba on her recent project ,I have worked with a few Zambian Models Christina, Mulenga Chileshe and Natasha Mapulanga. I’m yet to work with Wayaya Fashions on one of their big fashion shows coming up in March 2018.

AquilaSpeaks: Do you offer makeup Tutorials?

Thembi:Yes I do but it’s been a bit hectic because of my full time Job.

AquilaSpeaks:Small tutorial in a Paragraph?

Thembi:How to do a perfect brow. Clean and shape your brows by either threading, using tweezers or a blade. After shaping brush your eyebrows with a small makeup brush.
Use a brow pencil, gel liner (wax) in colour black or brown to define your eyebrows. If you are using gel liner(wax), you will need a small angle brush to define your brows especially in areas you don’t have enough hair, you can do the same with the pencil. When this is done, use concealer and a concealer brush to clean below and above your brows order to give it a clean finish look.

AquilaSpeaks: How appreciated is this craft in the entertainment industry?

Thembi: The makeup industry in Zambia has actually empowered local Zambian women because it’s a skill that has provided a source of income to Zambian women. Makeup artist are being hired for music videos, TV shows for the presenter’s makeup and fashion shows.

AquilaSpeaks: Which makeup brand would you recommend?

Thembi: I would recommend the following brands for face foundation, Maybelline fit me, wet n wild, loreal, mac, Estée lauder,nars, gosh.
Makeup palates morphe by Jacklyn hill, juvia palates, Nyx, ABH, Colour pop

AquilaSpeaks: Are you dating anyone?

Thembi: NO, currently single

AquilaSpeaks: Any words to female Zambians?

Thembi: Never look down on yourself you can be anything you choose to be the choice is yours. Get educated, always be innovative, be an entrepreneur and help other women get to the top.

There you have it everyone. Great to see a woman doing good. If you want to contact Thembi for anything, you can simply click, here. Thank you for your time, Thembi.

Look out for the next interview dropping next Monday. You never know who is next. 😎

SWISH – THE FACE OF FUTURE ZAMBIAN MUSIC?

Meet the rising star of a rapper hailing from Lusaka, he is the pride of Avondale. Enjoy the Exclusive interview with Swish.


 

AquilaSpeaks: Briefly describe yourself

Swish: I am a down to earth guy, crazy, funny and creative.

AquilaSpeaks: Where did you grow up?

Swish: I grew up in Avondale, Lusaka, Zambia.

AquilaSpeaks: What inspired you to become a musician?

Swish: I used to watch a lot of Channel O as a kid at age 9 and fell in love with the versatile styles of the late 2Pac, LL Cool J, Missy Elliot and got amazed how music can be used as a tool to inspire people.

AquilaSpeaks: What do you think of Zambian music presently?

Swish: Zambian music is growing vastly, the audio and visual quality has really improved.

AquilaSpeaks: Musically, what are your biggest influences and who are your favorite musicians?

Swish: My biggest influence is the late 2Pac. My favorite musicians are Nas, Kendrick Lamar and T.I.

AquilaSpeaks: What are some of the challenges you are facing as a Zambian musician?

Swish: Lack of airplay on some local radio stations.

AquilaSpeaks: You once had an interview with Trace, your music video has received some air play on Channel O. How did this make you feel?

Swish: It was a great feeling having my music playlisted on an international channel….it encouraged me to never give up, no matter what.

AquilaSpeaks: What is your vision as an artist?

Swish: To become internationally recognized and be affiliated to a wider platform that will help me encourage the youth to never give up on their dreams because I believe that if my dreams can come true, so can theirs.

AquilaSpeaks: What is your advice to fellow Zambian musicians?

Swish: Learn to be supportive of each other’s craft in the industry because at the end of the day, it’s collaboration that is the key to success, not competition.

AquilaSpeaks :Finally, What would be your dream venue ANYWHERE in the world to perform at?

Swish: At the Grammy Awards.


Latest album, Slideshow is available on the following online platforms:

1. iTunes -> https://t.co/i7b8UU9Erp

2. Spotify -> https://t.co/5x5SFSabub

3. Google Play -> https://t.co/foPX1I7QxC

4. Amazon -> https://t.co/XvchA2rGHO

5. Tidal -> https://t.co/vwYOmvfciK

6. Deezer -> https://t.co/dWdB4djdsT

7. Soundcloud -> https://t.co/SVKEbbdI5D

8. Mvesesani -> https://t.co/R8AGD6mQM3

9. Tuneworth -> https://t.co/PKcqHEshb7

interact with @Swishy_Swish on twitter

WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE ZAMBIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY?

fill_up_fnb_stadium_highlights-960x642

Hello everyone, long time no blogging, but izzz okay I am back for now. Thanks to all of you that have kicked me out of the comfort zone. It is because of you that I keep going. Recently I have been carried away by lots of things. Some of you already know that I got elected union president for my university so you can only imagine the kind of pressure I am going through. I think after this post, I still have two more posts before we wrap up this year.

So this week twitter has been blazing with enormous pettiness, but thankfully not entirely. There has been attempts to air solutions to the Zambian Music Industry stagnation. I think stagnation for lack of a better description. Also there was extreme bashing of the industry, So I decided to do a post yet again about the Zed music industry.

I guess everything stemmed from the FILL UP FNB STADIUM tour by Cassper Nyovest where 68000 people in South Africa showed up for a concert not to see Chris Brown. Cassper is getting a reputation for doing this sort of thing, as he previously filled the dome. He was congratulated by so many of his fellow musicians who do admit the 28 year old has really shifted the level to greater heights.

So the aftermath of this historical occurrence among some Zambians on twitter was how it is that none of our artists ever came close to such a milestone, how it is that we are lagging behind compared to other African countries. First of all, I wish to state that comparison is the thief of joy. We can’t suddenly wish our own artists or demand them to do something that took years to build. Because Cassper filled a stadium doesn’t necessarily mean Chefy or Jay Rox should accept a challenge.  Secondly, Cassper should not set the trend for our artists.

What I think we should do is accept that our industry is an infant for now and if we keep comparing it to The Nigerian or South African ones, we may only end up disrespecting the very artists that make us dance every Friday night at the Lounge. We can’t overlook the potential that has recently resurfaced in Zambia. Have you seen Dizmo? Lol! The future is bright. We should give it more time and the system will resolve itself. I truly doubt if anything will suddenly change, maybe two or more generations to come and we could be there. I am the most optimistic person so trust me, i am only being realistic.

You know I wish I could take my own advice, but it is kinda hard because  every  day  I am on YouTube, I see a new immaculate video from maybe Diamond, Run Town or Tekno and involuntarily I am craving and demanding  to see a similar video by a Zambian.  I guess it is what fuels our anger when we wish our own people could be that good and they kind of aren’t. I guess the frustration isn’t entirely aimed at pissing off our musicians, but to actually push them to do better. It is so upsetting to see many African musicians making global musical history and none of ours is on the  list. We can justify our comparison as some level of nationalism.

So what is really wrong with our industry?

  1. THE INDUSTRY LACKS A FINANCIAL MUSCLE. Trust me, if a tremendous amount of money was injected into it, a huge difference would be made. Musicians don’t have enough money to do incredible videos. They lack sponsors and most importantly themselves are not wiling to invest their own money into the craft. If they keep waiting for sponsors, they will wait forever.  Anyway, what they do isn’t considered very valuable and so how do we expect them to make a living or rather be competitive? Very few people are willing to pay for albums or pay for shows over K100.
  2. POOR PLANNING, MARKETING. How many management agencies do we have in Zambia? Do we have real music promoters with actual contacts to the outside world? Anyway, before we go to the outside world, how well do our artists market themselves locally? Some artists are only famous in Lusaka. There are some songs that you will only hear in Mufulira and nowhere else in Zambia. Most artists just release a song and hope it blows, not realizing investing in marketing would make such a difference. This is why so many good songs remain underground.  After the song is done, the best most do is throw it on on one of the music blogs hoping, accidentally, it will be downloaded by thousands and become a country hit. what are the odds? Artists also fail to brand themselves. How will your fans respect you when they dress better than you? How will they respect you when you drink from the same spot as them? Artists fail to create themselves into a symbol of public admiration.
  3. THE INDUSTRY ISN’T AN OPEN MARKET. In one way or the other, I feel our industry is regulated, not by the government, but by the players themselves. Radio DJs already know whose new song they will play for free. What about the population of poor underground artists? If our industry was truly a free market, so many artists would have made it to the top and replaced the Mugabes. For years now, the top artists continue to be the same. Is it because they are truly the best? How many new artists have come through in the US since 2010?  Look at how many new Nigerian artists we have seen of late. Is P.Square still running the game? There is clearly no room for rotation here because the system is regulated.
  4. INCONSISTENCY: Lots of new artists lack a level of consistency. They really need to learn something from Roberto, Slap D, Chef 187, Ruff Kaida, Macky 2 etc. Its like some artists were born to be one hit wonders and exit. Like they just wanted to taste a bit of fame and that was it. They fail to keep up with the trends, they fail to study their fans and some times lack discipline and are not humble enough to learn from legends. Of course nothing is way to easy, but if others can manage to be consistent, so can they.
  5. ORIGINALITY: How could it miss the list? Zambians sound like everyone else not Zambian these days. I do not know how and why we have failed to brand Zambian music and sell it to the world. There are a number of hit songs we have, and for respect of the singers, I won’t name them ,whose concept was stolen from foreign songs. A lot of songs done after 2010 are devoid of that great Zambian substantial touch.
  6. CREATIVITY: Truly, we can not overlook the enhancement in the creativity, but some of us are just hard to please with the little exposure we have as music connoisseurs. Poor lyrics, poor beats, production. I think we need a music school. People need a level of education, to help them analyse, focus and predict situations. I believe when you spend more time on something, you create quality. Some people can create a masterpiece in a night, but not everyone. I personally see a lot of intellect in Pompi’s lyrics. I see great production from KB, Magg 44, T. Sean, Shenky, Jazzy boy, Stash, Magician, Ricore and Reverb. They can still go a little further to change the game, by introducing a newly defined  level of Zambian music production. Evolution is everything. The idea of stealing beats, concepts and songs should remain in 2017. Also with creativity, everything is possible. You don’t need to feature Wizkid to sell. I mean look at Roberto.
  7. CAVALIER ATTITUDE OF FANS: If it comes to being indifferent to something, Zambians win. Zambian fans don’t give a sh*t. You really believe with this current attitude anyone in the world stands a chance to fill a stadium? You can’t blame them anyway for not finding music valuable. I mean they are loyal to politics and football. Only H.E Mr Edgar Lungu and Chipolopolo fill the stadium. This means if music is well marketed, things could change.
  8. LACK OF GOVERNMENT POLICY. I think the government should enforce some play local only laws.
  9. DEMOGRAPHICS: How do you expect a million views on a Zambian video when only a minute percentage of the population have access to the internet? I can just imagine how many views would be on YouTube had it not been for the Zambians in the diaspora. How do you expect people to buy a ticket/album for K100, when they live under the poverty line? How do you expect to make money off a population that don’t appreciate your craft?

I still believe Zambia has done good so far, just that because other industries are moving at a faster pace, we tend to think we not doing enough.Any way this just a subjective perspective, everyone is entitled to their own opinion really.

 

Zambian Twitter- The Evolution

 

South-African-Twitter-trends-for-2015

The last couple of years to 2010 saw an escalation in internet accessibility and consequently a rapid increase in the number of Facebook sign ups. This was a trend common among so many youths especially those in high school and college. However, the twitter field was more less a desert. Enthusiasm levels were not so high for sign-ups.

There was a very minimal number of Zambians on twitter. The majority of these were in the diaspora and had benefited from early exposure to the social network because of the countries they lived in like the US and the UK. Many locals had not heard about twitter and even a few of those who signed up wished it came with a manual.

However, the population has come to grow. The arrival of the Blackberry Smart Phone saw more people sign up because the smart phone allowed them to use the app which proved more convenient and easier to use than the web version.  As the smartphone became more and more affordable more people signed up. With an affordable data plan, the blackberry was convenient for the most urban users.

In no time was some news of some Zambian users attaining verification. Crisis Mr Swagger, a Zambian rapper was the first to announce an official verification. More Zambians, musicians mostly, followed after him in obtaining verified accounts.

Zambians were also beginning to get together to discuss issues. Insaka became a popular Zambian twitter platform of discussion. Every evening, Zambians on twitter would hold discussions under the hashtag INSAKA.

By the years, Insaka lost popularity as people discovered other ways to utilise their twitter. South African twitter has been known to be so open where Sex is discussed openly and freely by users and this spread to a few young Zambians. A lot of female users claimed to be feminists suddenly and many political commentators sprung up.  Pan-African traits of Zimbabwean twitter also spread to the Zambian side.

Currently is an account called Zed Curate where each week, a new Zambian shares with other Zambians their experiences and directs topics for Zambians to discuss. Politics, the economy and social life are discussed mainly.

Of late, myriads have crossed over from Facebook. It is possible to hear stories of users who left Facebook for twitter. Some think it is all because the new audience is more mature, but Chansa Kapapula, a prominent blogger and Zambian twitter pioneer thinks people are just choosing to embrace a new social network.

Many youths have used twitter to raise awareness of social and political irregularities. Disliked politicians are usually bashed on the platform and some view this as a form of entertainment. But not only politicians are humiliated, in an environment with self-imposed, Grammar ‘correctors’, fashion police, everything is possible.

Zambian twitter remains an interesting community to be a part of.

 

NB: You can Interact with me on twitter here